Three favourite places to eat in Cambridge

Cambridge News recently asked me to contribute to a piece in which I, along with a couple of other bloggers, shared a few of my favourite places to eat in the city.  It was difficult to choose as there are so many I love and I had a tight word limit but here’s what I wrote!

The Locker Cafe King Street Cambridge
Image credit: John Hodges

The Locker Café in King Street is close to my heart (and not only because of their amazing Chocolate Guinness cake, which is my current obsession!).  It opened just as I started writing my blog at the end of last summer and was the subject of my first post.  Co-owned by father and son John and Adam Hodges, the café is light and spacious with a balcony for sunny days.  Ceramics made by John are in daily use while art on the walls is curated by Adam’s mother and there’s live music on Sunday afternoons.  The Locker is a favourite spot for brunch with my husband and I often interview for the blog here, over tea and cake.

www.thelockercafe.co.uk

The Copper Kettle Kings Parade Cambridge

The Copper Kettle on King’s Parade is one of Cambridge’s oldest restaurants and it has one of the best views too, overlooking the historic buildings of King’s College and its world famous chapel.  It’s open all day, serving breakfast, brunch, lunch and cakes but in the evening the menu switches to Mediterranean cuisine with fish and vegetarian options alongside grilled meat dishes and salads.  I like to meet friends here in the early evening to catch up on news over a glass or two of chilled white wine and a selection of delicious meze that we share as we chat.

www.thecopperkettle.weebly.com

Restaurant Twenty-Two Cambridge

Restaurant Twenty-Two on Chesterton Road has recently reopened with chef Sam Carter and partner Alexandra Olivier offering creative modern British food with a twist, using seasonal ingredients from local suppliers.  Their 7 Course Tasting Menu quite simply blew us away.  Sam creates delectable flavours and presents every dish so beautifully but it’s also the textures in each plate of his food which constantly surprise and excite.  Returning last weekend with family, we enjoyed the set lunch menu which is exceptional value at £20 for three courses.  Once again, Sam had our taste buds dancing until the very last bite.

www.restaurant22.co.uk

For the full version of this article, published in Cambridge News on 28 April 2018, and to see where my fellow bloggers like to eat, just click on the link below.

https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/whats-on/food-drink-news/cambridge-food-bloggers-restaurant-reviews-14573223

Kettle’s Yard

Kettle’s Yard House and Gallery on Castle Street has recently reopened after a lengthy refurbishment which has enabled Director, Andrew Nairne, and his team to create new gallery space to display modern and contemporary art from around the world.

KY frontage
Image credit:  Hufton + Crow

 

The opening exhibition, “Actions.  The image of the world can be different”, showcases the work of thirty eight artists.  “Actions Part 2” will open on 11 April with a two screen film installation, “Auto Da Fe”, from John Akomfrah and paintings by Caroline Walker who, in collaboration with the charity Women for Refugee Women, has painted refugee women housed in temporary accommodation in London.

KY WindowAt the heart of Kettle’s Yard is the house, once home to Jim and Helen Ede who created it from four derelict eighteenth century cottages in the late 1950’s.  With a lifelong passion for art and having worked as a Curator at The Tate during the 1920’s, Jim became close friends with many artists including Ben and Winifred Nicholson, Christopher Wood and David Jones.  Over the years, Jim acquired a significant collection of art and sculpture which he brought to Kettle’s Yard along with furniture, glass and ceramics.  But the Edes equally valued natural found objects and artwork by their grandchildren.  More than anything, they wanted their art to be enjoyed in an informal domestic setting, holding open house every afternoon of the university term and welcoming undergraduates to their home.

Kettle's Yard paintings in house
Image credit: Kettle’s Yard

Kettle's Yard tableNatural light was crucial to the Edes.  The day I visited, the streets were carpeted in snow and the light had a very special ethereal quality to it.  I was struck by the tranquillity of the house and by its colour palette with exposed brick, varying tones of wood, natural linens, pebbles, feathers and shells, all harmonising with the Ede’s art collection to create a wonderful serenity.   Jim and Helen handed over the building and their collection to the University of Cambridge in 1966 so they knew it was in safe hands but it must have been a wrench for them to leave this peaceful haven when they moved to Edinburgh in 1973.

Kettle's Yard greenery in house
Image credit:  Kettle’s Yard

The Ede’s musical tradition continues today with a varied programme of contemporary music and chamber concerts in the house.  New archive and research areas have given enhanced research opportunities in collaboration with the University’s History of Art Department.  A breathtaking double height space is now home to Kettle’s Yard’s education and community programme, hosting a year round schedule of events and activities, many of them free, for all age groups.  It includes workshops, talks, panel discussions and artist led drop in workshops for families every Sunday.

Kettle's Yard education space
Image credit:  Hufton + Crow

At The Garden Kitchen Cafe, you’ll find tea, Fairtrade coffee, cake and light lunches with vegan, vegetarian and gluten free options.   The Shop offers a carefully curated selection of cards, prints, books and jewellery with ceramics from The Leach Pottery and from local ceramicists Rachel Dormor and Maree Allitt alongside beautiful bespoke wrapping paper from Cambridge Imprint, its design inspired by a Barbara Hepworth fabric.

Kettles Yard carved stone

Kettle’s Yard is a very special place that I know I will return to again and again.  There’s such a lot going on there, far more than I can write about in this post, so do check out the website for full details of all that’s happening over the coming months.  Then go and experience the magic of Kettle’s Yard for yourself.

http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk

Kettle’s Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

 

Cafe Abantu

A pot of really good Darjeeling tea and a slice of the most delicious rose and pistachio cake in this recently opened Hobson Street cafe perked me up on a gloomy February afternoon.  So I popped back (yes … more tea and cake!) to meet owner, Wendy Slade, and to chat about her new venture.

Abantu frontage

Firstly, I’m curious about the cafe’s name.  Wendy explained that the word “abantu” (or derivations of it) means “people” in many African dialects.  Wendy was born and raised in South Africa, where she trained as an accountant.  She came to England with her family twenty years ago.  “But I still miss the drumming heartbeat of Africa,” Wendy tells me.

Abantu pistachio and roseIt wasn’t long before she set up a gift shop, selling Fairtrade goods, at Manor Farm in Bourn, while a friend ran the coffee shop next door.  When the friend left, Wendy took over the coffee shop and taught herself to bake.  Gradually, that side of the business took over and ten years later, Wendy moved the cafe to Wysing Arts Centre, where it won a “Best Cafe in East Anglia” award.

“Then Stickybeaks came up for sale,” explained Wendy, “and our lease at Wysing was coming to an end so I decided to go for it and move into the city centre.”  Wendy and her team of twelve people, including the ex Stickybeaks staff who all joined her, took over the building on 19th January and were open for business at the end of the month.  They had hungry customers queuing down the street on Day 1!

Abantu team

Abantu saladThe Abantu team enjoys working in the open kitchen which Wendy says is run more as a “home” kitchen than an industrial cooking space.  They make all their own cakes and like to keep up with the latest baking trends.  Abantu’s menu changes every day, with an emphasis on seasonal ingredients used in a variety of dishes for breakfast and lunch.  There are always three or four salads on offer and Boboti, a South African meatloaf, is a menu staple.

Abantu signVegetarians, vegans and those who eat gluten free are well catered for here and there’s a Bambino menu for kids too, so this really is a destination for the whole family.  Staff are welcoming and the cafe has an airy yet cosy vibe with art from Naomi Davies, a Cambridge artist who works in pen and watercolour, on the walls and a couple of outside tables, ideal for watching the world go by on sunnier days.

 

http://www.cafe-abantu.co.uk

http://www.naomidaviesart.co.uk

42 Hobson Street, Cambridge CB1 1NL

 

Stem + Glory

Louise Palmer-Masterton is a powerhouse!  She has founded and is running two highly successful businesses in the city and she’s fizzing with energy and ideas.  I met Louise in Stem + Glory, her new vegan cafe in King Street.

Stem and Glory logo pic
Image credit: Stem + Glory

Louise tells me that she enjoys food and cooking and has herself been vegan for many years.  Camyoga, the yoga business that she started in 2003, took off straight away and over fourteen years has grown into a multi studio enterprise offering not only yoga classes but workshops and teacher training courses too.  Having opened a small cafe, really just for the yoga clients, Louise began to develop ideas for a larger vegan cafe and when a site became available at Mitchams Corner in 2016, she successfully crowdfunded the project to open a cafe and yoga studio there.  The cafe was open to the public from the start, offering fast, fresh and healthy plant-based food to eat in or take out through the day and vegan fine dining in the evenings.

When the opportunity came to open a city centre vegan cafe at the old Afternoon Tease premises in King Street earlier this year, Louise didn’t waste any time.  She again crowdfunded successfully to refurbish and refit both sites.  Mitchams Corner is now a table service restaurant at lunch and dinner.  The new King Street cafe, staffed by the existing Afternoon Tease team, is the place for fast healthy eating and it’s been buzzing since it opened its doors in November.

Stem and Glory counter
Image credit: Stem + Glory

If you’re eating in, you can pile your plate from a selection of hot dishes and salads for £9.  If you’re on the go, you can do the same but put it in a box (small, medium or large) to take away.  Wraps are always available along with cakes, coffee, tea, soft drinks and shakes.  There’s a small breakfast menu at the moment but that will be expanding soon and a brunch menu is on the way.

Stem and Glory cauli and rocket salad
Image credit: Stem + Glory

My daughter and I grabbed a table on a busy Saturday and we were eating the colourful food with our eyes before it got anywhere near our mouths!  Pumpkin tagine was aromatic while the earthy warmth of a beetroot and horseradish pie with mushroom was perfectly complemented by a fluffy mashed potato topping.  Spicy bulghur wheat salad came speckled with herbs and mixed seeds, carrot and fennel salad was fresh and crunchy while the cauliflower and rocket salad was drizzled with a silky tahini dressing.  There’ll be a different style of menu each week so there’s always something new and delicious on offer.

Louise’s success with Camyoga and Stem + Glory has been recognised with two awards this year – the Cambridge Business Excellence Awards Small Business of the Year and Best Newcomer at the Cambridge Food and Drink Awards.  And I can’t wait to see what Louise does next ….. she has big plans for Stem + Glory in 2018 so watch this space!

http://www.stemandglory.uk

13 King Street, Cambridge CB1 1LH

“Pots for Poverty” at The Locker Cafe

One of the best things about writing this blog is the people I meet.  They’re always interesting and everybody has a story to tell but lately, and maybe it’s just co-incidence, I’ve met several career scientists who also have a strong artistic bent.  There’s the orthopaedic surgeon who is a talented musician and a major mover on the city’s jazz scene.  Then there’s the seismologist turned photographer whose photographs of college libraries created a buzz when she exhibited recently at Michaelhouse.  And now I’ve met John Hodges, a consultant neurologist who makes the most beautiful ceramics.

raku pot
Image credit:  John Hodges

John worked for many years at Addenbrookes where he set up the first Memory Clinic and a dementia research group.  Following a sabbatical year in Sydney, John and his family moved to Australia where he established a research centre into frontotemporal dementia at the University of New South Wales.  This centre continues to thrive and John still has a part-time involvement but he is now based back in Cambridge where he is co-owner with his son, Adam, of The Locker Cafe on King Street, which I featured in a post in September and whose Chocolate Guinness cake is my current obsession!

20170905_153817.jpg

John has been creating ceramics for fifteen years.  Following courses in Cambridge and Suffolk and with the encouragement of potter friends here and in Australia, he built a studio in his garden, complete with a wheel and kiln.  John makes stoneware and raku pieces and last year raised over £2,000 for Jimmy’s Cambridge in a charity event that he held at home.

bowls stoneware
Image credit:  John Hodges

Now that The Locker Cafe is up and running, John is holding another charity event, “Pots for Poverty” at the cafe from Thursday 7 – Sunday 10 December.  As well as his ceramics, you’ll find stoneware pottery from Chesterton-based Susan Cupitt, art from Carol Gregory and her printmaking group, calendars by Sally Greaves featuring her vibrant and colourful photographs of Guatemala, Christmas cards, handmade candles in raku bowls and ceramic tree decorations.

raku candles
Image credit:  John Hodges

Proceeds will go to two local charities.  Jimmy’s Cambridge has been providing emergency accommodation for the city’s homeless for over 20 years.  CamCRAG, the Cambridge Convoy Refugee Action Group, works to help refugees in Northern France and elsewhere, raising awareness of their plight and sending regular convoys with clothing and other aid.

So do pop in to The Locker Cafe, check out these beautiful and unique pieces and maybe tick a few presents off your Christmas list or, better still, buy a Christmas present for yourself!

http://www.thelockercafe.co.uk

54 King Street, Cambridge CB1 1LN

 

The Locker Cafe

I love King Street.  Where else in Cambridge can you have a wet shave, buy a ukulele and replenish your art supplies, all without walking more than a few paces?  And now a new cafe, The Locker, has just opened.

 

Locker Cafe frontage

Co-owned by Cambridge residents John and Adam Hodges, it is a real family affair.  Dad, John, had a long held ambition to open a cafe in the city and when son, Adam, returned from a spell living abroad, they decided to go for it.  Having acquired their premises in June, they worked hard on a total refurb and opened at the end of August.

They’ve done a great job.  The cafe is light, airy and spacious with seating on the ground and first floors and a small balcony for sunny days.  Art on the walls, curated by Adam’s mother, is for sale and sculpture is also exhibited.  The team has future plans for live music and private hire of the cafe for events.

Locker Cafe balcony

I visited mid-morning and enjoyed a pot of green tea with an excellent white chocolate and raspberry blondie.  Service was cheerful and charming.  A small breakfast menu includes organic muesli, yoghurt, berries and sourdough toast.  Cakes and other baked goods are served through the day while lunchtime offerings include sausage rolls, sandwiches, panini and bruschette.  The menu includes vegan and gluten free options.

The tea selection is by T2, an Australian brand which Adam came to know during his time abroad.  The hot chocolate is also an Australian brand but the coffee comes from nearer home as it’s supplied by local coffee legends Hot Numbers, who have created Davy’s blend especially for the cafe.

And finally, I have to mention the four legged member of the family, Adam’s much loved border collie dog, Davy Jones, who inspired not only the name of this new venture but also that signature coffee blend.

Opening hours are Monday – Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm, Saturday 9.30am – 5.30pm and Sunday 10am – 4pm.

Instagram @thelockercafe,  Facebook The Locker Cafe

54 King Street, Cambridge CB1 1LN