What’s on in Cambridge – January 2020

As I compile this listing, we are in that beautiful lull between Christmas and New Year when you don’t quite know what day it is and meals are a smorgasbord of leftovers from the fridge.  It’ll be time to get fully functional again soon enough and to help us out of hibernation, there’s lots going on in the city as we welcome in a new decade.  I’ll update this listing through the month so do check back sometimes and let me know if you’d like your event to be included.  Happy New Year to all!!

Late afternoon on the River Cam
Late afternoon on the River Cam

4th    10am – 1pm  Family Saturday: Crazy Cone Creations.  Use twigs, paint and wire to make a crazy cone work of art.  Drop in event, no need to book.  Botanic Garden, Brookside.  http://www.botanic.cam.ac.uk

4th    2 – 4pm  Family First Saturday: Marvellous Mythology.  Fun activities and art making.  Free.  Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street.  http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

6th    7.30pm  An Orthodox Christmas Wassail with Chela and Buska, the Cambridge Georgian choirs.  Jesus College Chapel.  Free entry with retiring collection for Georgian charities.

7 – 11th    Merrily We Roll Along.  Festival Players.  Robinson Theatre, Hills Road.  http://www.ticketsource.co.uk/festivalplayers

11th    5 – 8pm  True Tales for Change.  The Cambridge Commons raises awareness of and tackles inequality in Cambridge.  In collaboration with Pivotal, they have commissioned five local artists and a songwriter to create works inspired by conversations with Cambridge people who have experienced inequality.  Public exhibition continues 12 and 13 January.  The Escape Community Space, The Grafton Centre.  FB True Tales For Change

12th    12 – 4pm  Studio Sunday. Practical art making workshops, no experience necessary.  Free, drop in.  Kettle’s Yard, Castle Street.  http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk

12th    4.30 – 6pm  Free Singing Workshop with Cambridge Jazz Festival Choir, a community vocal group singing jazz, soul, gospel and more.  No auditions, no need to read music as songs are learned by ear.  St Matthew’s Primary School, Norfolk Street, CB2    FB: Free Singing Workshop with the Cambridge Jazz Festival Choir

14th    2 – 4pm  Tour for blind and partially sighted adults: Fantastic Fans.  Go behind the scenes with a conservator for a rare opportunity to touch a variety of fans from the collection.  Guide dogs and companions welcome.  Free but booking essential by email to education@fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk   Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street.  http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

14th    7.30 – 8.45pm  Going It Alone:  the new breed of writer/independent publisher.  Author Sue Grossey tells us what it’s really like to be your own researcher, writer, designer, editor, publisher and marketing department.  Milton Road Library, Ascham Road.  http://www.friendsofmiltonroadlibrary.org.uk

14th    7.30 – 9pm  Mackays – the history of a local store.  Talk from Duncan Mackay describing exciting projects and turbulent times for one of Cambridge’s favourite family businesses.  Ross Street Community Centre, Ross Street.  http://www.millroadhistorysociety.org.uk

15th    1.15 – 2pm  “To eat or not to eat”: Vegetarianism and veganism in Europe, 1500 – 1800.  A talk with Dr Melissa Calaresu, “Feast & Fast” exhibition co-curator.  Free.  Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street.  http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

16th    7.30pm (doors and bar from 6.30pm)  January Jazz: Sirkis/Bialas International Qt.  Cambridge University Centre Wine Bar, Granta Place.  http://www.cambridgejazz.org

18th    12 – 4pm  The Eddington ‘Feel Good’ Festival.  Free activities to help you relax and unwind including yoga, meditation, barre ballet, dance sessions, health talks plus a chill out area with free refreshments from Eddie’s Cafe.  Free event, booking essential.  Storey’s Field Centre, Eddington  http://www.eddington-cambridge.co.uk

18th    1 – 2pm  British Sign Language exhibition and library tour.  Join one of the exhibition curators for a guided tour of The Rising Tide: Women at Cambridge exhibition, followed by an introductory tour of the wider University Library.  BSL interpretation provided by the Cambridge Deaf Association.  Free, suitable for all ages, under 18’s must be accompanied by an adult.  Booking required by email to hap40@cam.ac.uk  Cambridge University Library, West Road

18th    2 – 5.30pm  Literature Cambridge Study Day on Toni Morrison’s great novel “Beloved” (1987), a powerful account of the traumatic effects of slavery.  Two lectures and a round-table seminar.  Stapleford Granary, CB22 http://www.literaturecambridge.co.uk

18th    2pm and 4pm  My Musical Magical Hat.  Family concert for age 5+.  How do you choose which musical instrument to play?  Do you choose it or does it choose you?  Find out as Tim, Ruth and the Cambridge Phil reach into the world of the magical musical hat.  Cambridge Philharmonic Orchestra.  West Road Concert Hall.  http://www.cambridgephilharmonic.com

19th    1 – 4pm  Reflections on Homelands/Alternative Symposium.  Reflect on the themes and ideas of Homelands: Art from Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.  An informal afternoon with introductions to the exhibition and displays, a practical art workshop which will explore the nature of home and displacement plus a conversation to share personal stories and experiences.  Free, all ages.  Kettle’s Yard, Castle Street.  http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk

21st    2 – 4pm  Tour for blind and partially sighted adults: Fantastic Fans.  Go behind the scenes with a conservator for a rare opportunity to touch a variety of fans from the collection.  Guide dogs and companions welcome.  Free but booking essential by email to education@fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk   Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street.  http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

25th    10.30am – 4pm  Kettle’s Yard Welcome Day.  Discover your local gallery with a day of mini programme highlights: tours, talks and workshops for those new to Kettle’s Yard.  Also with British Sign Language and audio described introductions.  Free, all ages, drop in.  Kettle’s Yard, Castle Street.  http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk

25th    8pm  Im Abendrot.  Strauss and Mahler.  The Empyrean Ensemble.  Trinity College Chapel.  http://www.adcticketing.com

26th    10.30am – 4pm  Cambridge Vegan Market.  Over 40 stalls selling vegan food, clothes, drinks, cosmetics and more.  Guildhall, Market Square.  http://www.veganmarkets.co.uk/cambridge

26th    12 – 4pm  Studio Sunday.  Practical art making workshops, no experience necessary.  Free, drop in.  Kettle’s Yard, Castle Street.  http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk

26th    7.30pm  Sinfonia of Cambridge with St John’s College School Chamber Choirs.  Respighi, Vaughan Williams, Tchaikovsky.  West Road Concert Hall.  http://www.adcticketing.com

30th    5 – 9pm  LATE: Food, Faith and Wellbeing.  Panel discussion on the role of fasting in religion, talk from Wintercomfort on food and homelessness, poetry reading, 30 minute meditation session and a cacao ceremony.  The Cafe Health and Wellbeing menu includes non-alcoholic drinks and vegan food.  Free, booking required.  Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street.  http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

30th    5.30 – 7pm  As is your due: 50th anniversary of women’s admission to the University.  Talk and film recording the 50th anniversary celebration of women’s admission to the University of Cambridge, when in 1998 more than 800 women who matriculated before 1948 returned to Senate House to collect their degrees retrospectively.  Documentary followed by a Q&A with director, Lucy Thane. Booking essential.  Cambridge University Library, West Road  http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk

30th    7.30pm (doors and bar from 6.30pm).  January Jazz: Clovis Nicolas/Steve Fishwick Qt.  Cambridge University Centre Wine Bar, Granta Place.  http://www.cambridgejazz.org

31st    7.30 – 9pm  Zoology Late: Acoustic Spaces/Threatened Places.  A programme of music with University of Cambridge New Music Group.  Booked required.  Museum of Zoology, Downing Street.  http://www.zoo.cam.ac.uk

Narcissi from Cambridge Market
Narcissi from Cambridge Market

 

The Rising Tide: Women at Cambridge

The Rising Tide: Women at Cambridge exhibition marks 150 years since the foundation of the first women’s college and shines a light on the life of women at the University, from Nobel Prize winners to student activists to those who worked as bedmakers, gardeners, typists and cooks … women who faced a variety of challenges and broke down many barriers.

The Rising Tide: Women at Cambridge

The North and South Galleries of the University Library are lined with paintings and photographs of women who have made exceptional contributions in so many fields, to the University and to women’s equality.  From Baroness Brenda Hale of Richmond (President of our Supreme Court, who quashed the recent prorogation of Parliament and who also has a nice line in brooches) to Helen Stephens (the first female Head Porter of a Cambridge college) and Kate Litman (CUSU Women’s Officer 2019), to name just a few, these women have shaped and are shaping the University that we know today.

Baroness Brenda Hale of Richmond
Baroness Brenda Hale of Richmond

Downstairs in the Milstein Exhibition Centre, the story of the lived experience of women at Cambridge and their fight for equal educational rights is told through costumes, letters, documents and audio visual material.  It’s astonishing to realise that women were only given full membership of the University in 1948, previous requests for equality in 1897 and 1921 having been put to the vote and rejected.

Cambridge University Poster 1897
Image reproduced by kind permission of the Syndics of Cambridge

Girton College (founded 1869) and Newnham College (founded 1871) offered courses to women but they could not be awarded degrees.  Between 1904 and 1907, Trinity College Dublin offered these women the chance to travel to Dublin to officially graduate and receive a full degree – those who took up this offer were known as “steamboat ladies” due to their mode of travel!  And on what must have been a joyous day in 1998, 900 women who had never been able to graduate with full degrees processed up King’s Parade to Senate House to graduate at last.

Trinity College Dublin c. 1904
Trinity College Dublin c. 1904  Image credit: Girton College

Cambridge University Library has existed in some form since the middle of the 14th century.  Since 1934, its collections have been housed in a magnificent but slightly forbidding looking building on West Road designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, the architect who also created our iconic red telephone boxes and Battersea Power Station.  The Library contains more than 8 million books and periodicals, 1 million maps and thousands of manuscripts.  As a legal deposit library, it is entitled to acquire a copy of every book and journal published in the UK and Ireland, which explains its 125 miles plus of shelving and the fact that said shelving extends by 2 miles every year.

Cambridge University Library
Image credit: Cambridge University Library

There is so much to see in this moving and thought provoking exhibition.  It’s a wonderful chance to explore collections from across the University and colleges in this iconic Library building.  The exhibition and a linked programme of events is free and open to all.  The Rising Tide: Women at Cambridge runs until 21 March 2020 and is open every day except Sunday.

http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk